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Category: Omnia

  1. Importance of Understanding Soil Variability in Vines – Vineyard – Nick Strelczuk

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    Nick Strelczuk precision technology specialist for HutchinsonsNick Strelczuk highlights the importance of understanding soil variability, especially in the context of high value crops like vines.

    Nick Strelczuk, precision technology specialist with Hutchinsons, explains that TerraMap is a new highly accurate soil mapping service offered at two levels of service, standard and premium. It uses gamma-ray detection technology to measure 21 important soil parameters at a resolution of 800 points per hectare.

    The scanning can be carried out irrespective of crop cover or soil moisture at a breadth and resolution unheard of until its launch back in spring 2019.

  2. Consistency is Key in a Changing Climate – Precise Mag – Jim Clark

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    Setting up and running a successful AD plant in a high rainfall, grassland and intensive dairy area takes some management.

    Located just east of Dumfries in south west Scotland, Tinwald Power runs a 1MW anaerobic digestion plant fuelled with a mix of grass, forage rye and whole crop silage, supplemented as necessary with livestock manures.

  3. Advance in Precision Farming Connectivity – Farmers Guardian – Oliver Wood

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    Oliver WoodCollaborations with machinery manufacturers Claas and Vaderstad and data management system Muddy Boots means farm data can now be moved from one machine or system to another within Hutchinsons’ Omnia Precision Agronomy system.

    Announcing the development at Crop Tec, Oliver Wood, Hutchinsons precision technology manager, said: "This is a significant step change in the way that data is handled for precision farming. For some time now, we have been working with our industry colleagues to look at how to connect platforms together to transfer data using modern cloud computer systems, which means that the user does not have to handle any data."

  4. Technology Assistance – South East Farmer – Nick Strelczuk

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    Nick Strelczuk precision technology specialist for HutchinsonsThis year's wet conditions have meant many growers have not been able to complete their autumn drilling, so will have to look at spring cropping options once soils begin to dry.

    According to Nick Strelczuk, precision technology specialist for Hutchinsons, farmers can be assisted by current and new developments in precision technology such as Omnia and TerraMap to maximise the returns from spring cropping and be as efficient as possible in the circumstances.

  5. 2020: A Year of Opportunity – South East Farmer – Stuart Hill

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    Stuart_Hill0217On Wednesday 13 November the South of England Agricultural Society hosted its annual Farming Conference at the South of England Showground in Ardingly, West Sussex.

    Bringing together over 250 farmers, landowners, agriculturalists, and industry representatives from across the South of England, the topic of this year’s debate was titled ‘From Uncertainty to Opportunity’, with conversation centred around considering whether, Brexit or otherwise, the industry has a positive future.

  6. Data to Drive Machinery Choices – Agri Machinery – Oliver Wood

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    Oliver WoodA machine's ability to work with data could become one of the main factors driving purchasing decisions.

    That is the view of Oliver Wood, precision technology manager for Omnia Precision Agronomy.

    Speaking at the Institution of Agricultural Engineers' 'Landwards' conference in Peterborough, he said farmers used to choose machines based on aspects like size, speed and power.

    He thinks that might change: "In the future they could choose their machines according to which machine can create the best and most useable data."

  7. Exciting precision technology developments at LAMMA – Agronomist & Arable Farmer – Oliver Wood

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    ConnectOne of the main sticking points with precision farming has always been moving data from one system or machine to another one.

    However, with the Omnia Precision Agronomy system this is now easier than ever before!

    Visit Hutchinsons at LAMMA to hear how exciting collaborations with leading machinery and data management systems such as Claas, Väderstad and Muddy Boots, has resulted in much improved streamlined data connection.

  8. Exciting precision technology developments in Omnia unveiled at CropTec – Agronomist & Arable Farmer – Oliver Wood

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    Oliver Wood with TerraMapOne of the main sticking points with precision farming has always been moving data from one system or machine to another one. However, with the Omnia Precision Agronomy system this is about to get easier than ever before!

    Visit Hutchinsons at CropTec to hear how exciting collaborations with leading machinery and data management systems such as Claas, Väderstad and Muddy Boots, has resulted in much improved streamlined data connection.

  9. Boosting Accuracy and Detail of Soil Analysis – Precise – Oliver Wood

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    Terra Map - Soil OptixAgronomy firm Hutchinsons claims the technology at the centre of its new soil scanning system offers a greater level of precision than is possible with established techniques.

    When compared with traditional zone-based scanning or grid-based sample point systems, measurement of a wider range of soil quality properties and greater accuracy when measuring them are the key claims for new soil analysis technology introduced this season to the UK by agronomy company Hutchinsons.

  10. 2019 Omnia Precision Agronomy Award open for entries - British Guild of Agricultural Journalists - David Hutchinson

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    The British Guild of Agricultural Journalists’ 2019 Omnia Precision Agronomy Award, sponsored by Hutchinsons’ Omnia Precision Agronomy, is open for entries.

    Entries are open to any Guild member who has had a feature about precision farming technologies in arable agriculture or horticulture published or broadcast between 1 August 2018 and 1 August 2019.

    The award reflects the growing use and importance of precision farming technologies in growing crops, and the need for agricultural journalists to report on its intricacies and potential with clarity.There is a £1,000 prize for the winning article and £500 for the runner up, with the results to be announced at this year’s Guild Harvest Lunch in London on 17 October.