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Category: Disease

  1. Crop Watch North - Farmers Weekly - Helen Brown

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    Helen Brown - Thumbnail CropwatchJust as we were starting to shout for rain up in Cumbria, our usual weather patterns returned. We have now had a few very wet weeks, causing some quick growth in all crops, and are hoping the rain knows how to stop again.

    Winter cereals are now all out in ear and the last of the T3 fungicides are being applied in winter wheat.

    In general, winter wheat and barley are looking well and the gates are being shut until harvest time.

  2. Consider Late Season Fungicides Carefully – Anglia Farmer – David Ellerton

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    Dr Dave Ellerton WheatGrowers are being advised to consider late season fungicide programmes carefully amid reports of low disease pressure this year.

    Moderate disease levels in wheat due to the hot, dry summer in 2018 generally resulted in cost-effective but lower yield responses to fungicide programmes than the previous season, says Hutchinsons technical director David Ellerton.

    "Despite the dry conditions later in the season, the largest yield increases were often in response to the flag leaf or T2 timing in Hutchinsons small plot trials, although drought and subsequent early senescence reduced the response in many cases."

  3. Aggressive Blight Strain Too Serious to Ignore – Arable Farming – Darryl Shailes

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    Darryl Shailes v2Spring has sprung, although the number of frosts we've had in May does make me wonder. I'm not sure what effect it has had on the blossom on the fruit trees and berry bushes in the garden; only time will tell. The plum and codling moth traps are out so hopefully we’ll have a bit less fruit damage this year.

    We've had a first hatch of cygnets and hopefully we'll have also got some young calves in the meadow over the river so, yes, spring has sprung in the Waveney Valley at least.

    The recent rains, while very welcome, would have been better without the hail and

  4. Need for Broad-Spectrum Fungicides in Brassicas – The Vegetable Grower – Andy Richardson

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    Andy Richardson of the Allium & Brassica CentreBrassica growers know only too well that they must produce vegetables free from pests and disease in order to satisfy the ever-demanding retail sector. They need to grow great quality brassicas with good shelf appeal and with no visual blemishes.

    According to ADAS Crop Notes, recent warm weather interspersed with rain showers has encouraged the development of leaf diseases such as ring spot light leaf spot and Alternaria. Ring spot has been cited as the main disease affecting brassicas with reported incidence of this in kale in the east.

    Ring spot and Phoma are reported on purple sprouting broccoli and Brussels sprouts. In sprouts, light leaf spot affects quality and appearance of the buttons and its presence can lead to crop rejection.

  5. Carlisle Agronomy open day showcases routes to higher yields - Helen Brown, Lewis McKerrow

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    Looking at variety trials in CarliseThe annual Hutchinsons Carlisle crop demonstration open day to be held at Midtown Farm, Kirkbampton, Carlisle on Tuesday 18th June, by kind permission of the Brown family, promises an exciting insight into how yields can be improved through variety selection, targeted agronomy and precision technology.

    A host of demonstrations will hone in on four key topics; the latest winter wheat, barley and spring barley varieties, seed rate trials, the role of forage yield mapping and the newest precision farming tools from Hutchinsons.

  6. Keep on top of disease – even when pressure is light – The Scottish Farmer – David Ellerton

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    Dr Dave Ellerton T1 WheatEVEN in times of low disease pressure, late season fungicide programmes need to be well planned and timely, according to Hutchinsons' technical director, David Ellerton.

    Moderate disease levels in wheat in 2018 resulted in cost effective but lower yield responses to fungicide programmes than the previous season, he pointed out, but "Despite the dry conditions later in the season, the largest yield increases were often in response to the flag leaf or T2 timing in our small plot trials, although drought and subsequent early senescence reduced the response in many cases."

  7. New strains cause disruption - Potato Review - John Keer

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    Blight1

    Dr John Keer, of Richard Austin Associates, who has many years' experience of running blight trials, told delegates new strains of blight have disrupted the way growers and agronomists put their fungicide programmes together, not least following the failure of fluazinam to control the so-called dark green' blight strain, otherwise known as 37_A2.

    "I don't believe we should be using fluazinam, he said. "Anyone who went to the Eurofins trials in 2017 would have seen